Monday, March 20, 2017

The Way She Dissipated and Danced Over There--By Ndaba Sibanda--Kuwait

The Way She Dissipated and Danced Over There*

She left some villagers wet but devastated.
Will she reimburse them for their losses?

Her love for gamboling was so strong in 2017
that it engulfed cars and flooded away bridges.

Sis C Dineo cavorted with muscular winds and rain
in Mozambique and South Africa and Zimbabwe.

*Cyclone Dineo`s trail of blessings and destruction.

Ndaba Sibanda is a Zimbabwean-born writer. His poems, essays and short stories have been published in Africa and the USA. Ndaba currently lives and teaches in Kuwait. Of his career, he says, "writing is my life, and my second wife".

11 comments:

  1. Very well described Ndaba, but I do not believe they will be
    reimbursed for their expenses. Republics of Mozambique
    South Africa and Zimbabwe must have fear "The Way
    she dissipated and Danced Over There" *Cyclone
    Dineo`s trail of blessings and destruction. I
    believe this is great writing Ndaba, and
    I see the destruction,but where is
    the blessings?
    Yancy

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Yancy. In the poem I used the word 'wet' to show that people, animals and plants stand to benefit from the abundance of water. In short, in spite of the environmental damage caused by the cyclone , rain tends to deliver water to places where it is needed to support life. The redistribution of fresh water in the water cycle is a blessing!

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    2. A great explanation Ndaba. Something I never thought of.
      I now see destruction can be a blessing in disguise.
      Thanks for the education.
      Yancy

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  2. Thank you, Ndaba,
    I have much to learn about your corner of the world. Your poem is most helpful.
    Blessings,
    Michael

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  3. Hello Ndaba
    You have captured the sadness and poignancy of the devastation and I hope the blessings were the made as people supported one another to rebuild some of what they lost. Thank you for sharing this with us.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Anne. You really nailed it!

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  4. Ndaba, thank you for sharing your talent once again. The poem is poignant and well written. Bad weather, whether driven by cyclonic winds or winds of adversity, are no fun to encounter. I have learned through sad experience that the rebuilding process in both cases, can bring us closer to our maker, if we let it.
    Sincerely, Charlene

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Charlene. Indeed, that is true. We begin to come together and seek providential help.

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